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OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION, INC. 



10! PARK AVENUE 



NEW YORK 17 



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£&A/OEDV§ 



The 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
STEEL CONSTRUCTION, INC 



is a membership corporation representing the struc- 
tural steel fabricating industry of the United States. It 

c 

was organized in 1921 and incorporated under the 
laws of the State of New York in 1925. Among its 
members are more than 244 of the nation's largest 
and most responsible concerns which normally fabri- 
cate and erect more than 85 per cent of the country's 
annual tonnage for buildings, bridges, and other steel 
structures. Supported entirely by membership dues, 
it is a non-profit service organization, which all quali- 
fied fabricators are invited to join. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

SPECIFICATION FOR THE 
DESIGN. FABRICATION AND ERECTION 
OF STRUCTURAL STEEL FOR BUILDINGS 

(Riveted. Bolted and Arc-Weloeo Construction) 



Thi» Speo/kaikm define* the practice adopted by the Amencar r intitule of Sled 
Construction in the design, fabrication and erection of rtmctura! steel ft* 



ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS 



SECTION I. TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION. 



THE A. I. S. C. PURPOSES 



Standard Specification 

The A. I. S. C. Standard Specification for the 
Design. Fabrication and Erection of Structural 
Steel for Buildings — Riveted. Bolted and Arc- 
Welded Construction, is generally accepted 
throughout the United States. The Specifica- 
tion has been revised as of June. 1949. It ifi 
included in many municipal building code- 
by reference. 



was organized. 



The purposes for which the Institute 

and in furthering which its activities are conducted. 

are: 

1. To further better methods — and to eliminate waste 
in the design, fabrication, and erection of structural 



-teel through a cooperative effort based upon simplifi- 
cation and standardization. 

2. To promote the growth of the fabricated structural 
steel industry by expanding its possibilities and its 
markets. 

3. To establish and promote standards of ethical busi- 
ness relations and to bring about uniform trade cus- 
toms and usages within the industry, so that all who 
deal with the industry may transact their business 
with a minimum of misunderstanding. 

4. To increase the fund of useful engineering knowl- 
edge and to promote the science and the art of steel 
construction through technical research: and to main- 
tain a staff of district engineers to disseminate such 
information to Architects, Engineers, and Public 
Officials and to assist them in its application. 

5. To collect and disseminate pertinent statistical in- 
formation so that those engaged in the industry may 
be able to conduct their business more efficiently. 

6. To develop for the industry a better understanding 
of the element- of cost through the use of the A. I. S. C. 
standard system of cost accounting. 

7. To foster, in general, the improvement of condi- 
tions and business relationships within and without 
the industry. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION 



CODE OF STANDARD PRACTICE 

FOR STEEL BUILDINGS 

AND BRIDGES 



AS ADOPTED 1*24 
RCviSEO OCCCMBCA I. ItU 



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UM(nT lkCluOCS Th£ a i S c STANQAffO P»OK>$al COwTHACT 

AMQ 5TANQAOO OCLXASC *NO iNOCMNlTY AGR££M£NT. 



SECTION 1 GENERAL- 






The rules and practices hereinafter defined are adopted by the American Institute 
of Sted Construction as standard lor the industry and shall p>vern all oondiDora 
relating to the use of Cla« A' Sir^cturaJ Steel, unless the contract bet»«n the 
Buyer and Seller specifies otherwise 

(b) D**ifn, Fabrication »nd Erection. 



Code of Standard Practice 

This Code is the standard guide to approved 

American practice in all dealings between the 
purchaser and the fabricator of structured 

steel for buildings and bridges. It \\ as revised 

in December. 1946. It is frequently included 
by reference in a purchase contract, assurin 
that each party knows in advance what to 
expect from the other. The Standard Proposal 
Contract of the A. I. S. C. is printed with it. 
The architect or engineer is enabled. b> use of 
this standard form, to a— ure his client that 
be will receive complete and comparable bids 
from all fabricators on a contract. 



AMERICAN 



INSTITUTE OF 



STEEL CONSTRUCTION, INC 

101 Park Avenue, New York 17, N. Y 



2 



COPYRIGHT 1951 BY A. I. S. C. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

STEEL CONSTRUCTION 






STANDARD BOOKS 

FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN 



STEEL CONSTRUCTION: Manual of The American 19">0. i> lor use in instructing high school, trade school 
Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. — The Manual of 



Steel Construction is the acknowledged standard design 
handbook for structural steel buildings and bridges. It 
has merited and won universal acceptance in the pro- 
fessions and by local, state and federal government 
authorities. The first edition appeared in 1927 and the 
latest revisions were made in 1949. The 432-page book 

contains authoritative data relating to physical proper- 
tie- of beams, columns, channels, angles and other items 

used in structural steel design. The Manual also con- 
tain- complete up-to-date texts of the Code of Standard 
Practice, Standard Specification ami Standard Proposal 

Contract, The Manual is available with index tabs at 

$3.00 or without tabs at S2.00. 

STRUCTURAL ^HOP DRAFTING: A. L S. C. Text- 

booh, Vol. L — This completely new work, published in 



and college students and beginning draftsmen in the 
rudiments of the art and practice of structural steel 

detailing. It i- available at $3.00. 







i 



STEEL INSURES STRENGTH AND SECURITY 3 



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Steel bridge over the Watauga River, Tennessee, recipient of a Class I Prize Bridge Award in A.I.S.C. 1948 

annual contest for most beautiful bridges. 




Construction of arch 
for one of three giant 
steel hangars, Inter- 
national Airport, New 
York City. 



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AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

7 STEEL CONSTRUCTION 



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Industrial plant with steel frame, for Continental Can Co., Inc., West Mifflin, Pa. 



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Postwar skyscraper of steel construction at TOO Park 
Avenue, in Grand Central district, New York City. 




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STEEL INSURES STRENGTH AND SECURITY 5 



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INSTITUTE PUBLICATIONS FOR YOUR USE 



\. Manual ol >teel ( ion >tructioii — Regular Edition — 12.00 posts e 
prepaid; Thumb Indexed Edition — 13.00. po>tuge prepaid 

H. Specification f<»i the Design, Fabrication ami Erection of Strw 
tural Steel I Buildings- Revised June, 1949. 

i i ode ol Standard Practice for Steel BuiMinj hi. I Bridges- 
Re^ i- «l I )« '< rniliiT, l n in. 

D. Priw Bridges, 1928-11 '— lllu u ati <l booklet 

E. Requirement* for Buildingi to Resist Earthquakes, 



I Static Test* of Riveted Joints — h> Jonathan Jones (reprint froi 

Civil I i' h , i in-. Ma) . 1940). 

G Fatigue Provisions in Riveted Jointi by Jonathan Jones, i -hiel 

Engin I .t I m i * ;it t < I Steel < on struct ion. licihlrliem Steel 

• ompan) . 

II Steel ' lumni <>l Rolled VN < <• 1 « Flangi Section, Progresi Report 
N... I id No. 2, \ I M i mIiiimm Research ui Lehigh I niver* 

l.\ Bruce lohnston and Lloyd Chenej 

I Ri\eted Si li-Rigid Beam-to»Column ( lonnertiou I Yogn I ! 
port No. I I'N Robert \. lieclitnian and Bruci <* Johnstoi 

I ii;rn..fiii; I - -. nli.il- | W . ] < 1 1 i > |>\ II \1;il<«»lin I * I H - 1 (n 

print from Tin \X riding Journal, \|»mI I'HJ i. 

K. Perforated < ovei l*lat< roi Steel < oluinnt l.\ imbrosi II 
Stang and Martin i ren»pan fivi lertioni reprint from Jourm 

of i;< «..»• National Bureau ol NamLicd, 1942-1941. 

1 I ' • Kffi i ui \ I .i»t i mi r - on i In I .ii in N i ength of a 

Mi.tiiidl J. .1 \ ReM h Report Immh Tin I it linological 

lUti N I iiiv i i i! % I \ iiiMoii. HI. 

M Steel Building « odi I ttanju Viulwed In I H Hi i Ih 

> f I 'Mm \ | | . pi im from I ii girw < . ing N« 

Id « ' O |..|i. I I I. 

"I" Uigid I ranu^ in Steel In John 1 1 <,» ifhll. 



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Strength: Steel is the symbol of strength. It Fire Safety: Steel will not burn. There are 

no structures more inherently fire-safe than 



is used for the world's great structures be- 



cause of its ability to withstand enormous the modern skyscraper, built with a steel 



pressures and stresses. "Strong as steel" is 
a well-deserved comparison. 



Uniformity: Every process in making steel 



18 supervised and scientifically safeguarded 
to maintain uniform quality of the highest 
order. 



Endurance: Steel structures are built for 
the ages. The strength of steel is permanent 
and does not deteriorate under service load- 

and stresses. 



fran 



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Compactness: Structural steel provides the 
maximum amount of usable interior space, 
with a minimum of obstructions. 



Speed: Steel-frame buildings have a record 
for more rapid construction than any other 
type of fire-safe structures. Members are fab- 
ricated off the site and are delivered ready 
to be placed in position. 



Toughness: The shock produced by sud- 



Salvage: Structural steel offers high salvage 



denly-applied overloads is more readily value with low removal cost. Many steel 
resisted by steel than by other structural 



materials. Steel-frame buildings are built to 



withstand earthqual 



* ^ • 



buildings and bridges have been taken down 
at the end of their useful lives and the steel 
in them re fabricated for other uses. 



Adaptability: Steel-frame buildings lend Economy: For both small and large struc 
themselves readily to changes in layout. The tures, steel provides dollars-and-cents sa\ 
interior may 



be redesigned 



at will and 



ings for the investor and the owner. 



changes in the framework can be made with 



relative economy. 



Versatility s Bee 



Service: Behind every tun of structural steel 

stands the responsibility of the giant Ameri- 

of the great variety of can steel industry, with its research, manu- 



shapes in which structural steel is made as 



facturing, engineering, 



design 



and fabri- 



a standard product, it comes handily to the eating experience. The entire industry i- 
designer's use, no matter what type of struc- committed to a policy of public and customer 
ture he is called on to devise. 



service. 




STEEL INSURES STRENGTH AND SECURITY 7 



A. I. S. C. DISTRICT OFFICES 

Throughout the United Stotes 



HtAOOUAOTtffS 

Of A.ki.C- 




1951 DISTRICT ENGINEERS 

of 
American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. 



ATLANTA 3, GEORGIA 
J. M. Marshall, Jr. 

Candler Building 

CHICAGO 4, ILLINOIS 

Henry I'enn 

53 West Jarkson Blvd. 

CLEVELAND 11. OHIO 
Vlexander Miller 
520 Leader Building 

l)\LL\S 2. TEXAS 

R. B. Reilly 

I 122 Jackson St. 

GREENSBORO, V C. 

E. E. Hanks 

Jefferson Standard Bldjr. 



LOS ANGELES 15, CALIF. 

Cliarles M. Corbit, Jr. 
71 I W. Olympic Blvd. 



MILWAUKEE 2, 

Willardll. Hart 
7.?> N. Water St. 



WIS. 



NEW YORK 17, \. 

John G. Hotehkiss 
101 Park Avenue 



Y. 



OMAHA 2. NEBRASK V 

John D. Griffiths 

120 W. O. W. Building 

PHII ADELPIIIA 3, PA. 
Ilenr\ J. Stetina 

1617 I'enns\ l\ ania Blvd 



ST. LOUIS I, MISSOURI 

N. J. Law 
818 Olive St. 

SAN FRANCISCO I. CALIF. 

Harrv B. Corlelt 
57 Post St. 

SEATTUE I, WASH. 

Elmer E. Gunnette 

777 Dexter Horton Building 

TOPEKA, KANS VS 

George W. Lamb 

620 New England Bldg. 

WORCESTER 2, MASS. 

Ernest N. Adams 

192 Chandler St. 



RICAN INSTITUTE OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION 






PAR I Li 



It 



NEW TORI 1 



clephone Mi 



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STEEL INSURES STRENGTH 



ND SECURI 




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